Dogfight: How Apple and Google Went to War and Started a Revolution

Based on this excerpt published in The Atlantic yesterday, Fred Vogelstein’s new book about Google, Apple, and the smartphone revolution is looking pretty good. From the excerpt:

On the day Jobs announced the iPhone, the director of the Android team, Andy Rubin, was six hundred miles away in Las Vegas, on his way to a meeting with one of the myriad handset makers and carriers that descend on the city for the Consumer Electronics Show. He reacted exactly as DeSalvo predicted. Rubin was so astonished by what Jobs was unveiling that, on his way to a meeting, he had his driver pull over so that he could finish watching the webcast.

“Holy crap,” he said to one of his colleagues in the car. “I guess we’re not going to ship that phone.”

Booting Up

There’s something magical for me about the purr of a game console starting for the first time, the chime of a new computer, the progress bar reaching 99%. It’s one part childlike anticipation – of the new, the different, the better – but one part a recognition of the incredible possibilities afforded us by each generation of devices, software, and services, whether that is the transformative power and portability afforded by our always-connected smartphones or the widespread success of mass political and social movements coordinated by social networks.

There’s this bond we forge with our devices, our favorite apps, our most enjoyable games. They extend our minds, our abilities, our entertainment, and make an irreversible impact on our lives.

My aim is to explore the design, potential, experience, and the ultimate impact of the technologies we see and touch every day, as well as talk about what’s coming next. Hope you enjoy the ride.